Aug 29 2006

Katie and high school

Tag:Tag , , , Cyn @ 11:26

Katie is absolute­ly lov­ing school.

Well, she loves the social aspect, and the chal­lenge of inter­act­ing with new instruc­tors. She isn’t hap­py about liv­ing by a bell, and of course all of us are adjust­ing to liv­ing on the school’s timetable in gen­er­al.

At the end of the very first day, she called and asked if she could go hang out with her new friends at a near­by cof­fee shop. That’s my girl, the extro­vert. She’d already made friends and con­tin­ues to do so. So much for any wor­ries (which we didn’t have) about her social skills.

She’s doing well aca­d­e­m­i­cal­ly, too. We talk about her school work and she asks for input at times, so I know what she’s doing. It isn’t near­ly the same as the lev­el of involve­ment required for home­school­ing, but it’s some­thing.

She isn’t accus­tomed to the adver­sar­i­al rela­tion­ship some teach­ers and staff mem­bers auto­mat­i­cal­ly assume towards stu­dents, and it isn’t some­thing I ever want her to accept as right or nor­mal. Expect­ed at this lev­el, maybe. But not right.

I’m still hav­ing some “emp­ty nest” feel­ings, but see­ing her thrive cer­tain­ly helps deal with them. Home­school­ing was def­i­nite­ly the right thing for us for the past few years, and did pre­pare her well for high school. We have no regrets at all there!


Aug 10 2006

Geography is colorful — and a whole lot more

Nation­al Geograhic is lead­ing the My Won­der­ful World cam­paign. There are sug­ges­tions for par­ents, kids, teens, and edu­ca­tors.

I wan­na be a teen. I want to get a pass­port and a nifty lit­tle GPS unit and go geo­caching and explore the world and learn oth­er lan­guages.


Aug 06 2006

In transition

Tag:Tag , , , , TechnoMom @ 14:02

Katie is going to high school in a few weeks, a 10th grad­er. The school is much larg­er than the one she attend­ed last fall — approx­i­mate­ly the same pop­u­la­tion as my own alma mater when I was there.

I, at least, will con­tin­ue to write here, as I’ve been inter­est­ed in home­school­ing and edu­ca­tion much longer than I’ve had a child at home offi­cial­ly being home­schooled. In fact, I first heard of home­school­ing as a mod­ern real­i­ty right after I grad­u­at­ed in the mid-1980s, and was imme­di­ate­ly intrigued. I read every­thing I could find about it, and have kept up that con­nec­tion since then.

Katie is all excit­ed, of course. I’m excit­ed for her. I fear she may be damp­en­ing that excite­ment down a lit­tle because she knows that I’ll miss her, but she shouldn’t. That’s just a nor­mal part of being Mom­my. Let­ting go is in the job description.Trying new things is in hers.


Aug 06 2006

Quote of the Day

Tag:Tag , , , , TechnoMom @ 13:52

If you can­not write well, you can­not think well, and if you can­not think well, oth­ers will do your think­ing for you.”

George Orwell


Aug 05 2006

Online Writing Labs

So any­way, I meant to post about those Online Writ­ing Labs (OWLs) that many col­leges have put online.

Their con­tents and qual­i­ty vary wide­ly from one col­lege to the next. They’re intend­ed to help stu­dents write their papers at what­ev­er time they get around to doing them, wher­ev­er they hap­pen to be. Good ones include online access to ref­er­ence tools such as dic­tio­nar­ies, the­saurus­es, and gram­mar usage guides, a link to the school’s library, any for­mat­ting stan­dards estab­lished by his school in par­tic­u­lar, and some­times more spe­cif­ic mate­r­i­al depend­ing on the type of stu­dent expect­ed to be using the OWL.

Unfor­tu­nate­ly, some schools have slapped a list of links up on a set and called it an OWL. I won’t be rec­om­mend­ing any of those piti­ful lit­tle things.

Yes, it’s per­fect­ly fine for oth­ers to use these sites. They aren’t behind the school’s fire­walls, so they are a resource that has been gen­er­ous­ly shared with the pub­lic. If you find one espe­cial­ly help­ful, con­sid­er send­ing an email to the site’s authors/editors, thank­ing them for their efforts


Aug 05 2006

Neat resource!

I was brows­ing through a mag­a­zine about writ­ing today and came across an arti­cle about online writ­ing labs (OWLs), sug­gest­ing that writ­ers make use of them as ref­er­ence tools.

I was dis­tract­ed, though, by this: Ink, “A Free, Mul­ti­play­er, Online Game for Writ­ing & Com­mu­ni­ty.”

Imag­ine that you’re surf­ing the Web and you dis­cov­er a site called Ink…You click Enter, and your brows­er loads a chat win­dow and the image of a cityscape. A cap­tion informs you that you are in the City Cen­ter. Almost imme­di­ate­ly, some­one notices that you’ve arrived and begins talk­ing with you in the chat win­dow. “Wel­come to Ink,” the stranger says. “This is a great place. But we have a prob­lem right now, and I’m hop­ing you can help. Our neigh­bor­hood isn’t doing well. We need to get a group of peo­ple togeth­er to address this prob­lem. Can you help us? We need to design a fli­er that will moti­vate peo­ple to come to a meet­ing where we can talk about this prob­lem. We need to draft a res­o­lu­tion that we can cir­cu­late to those who show up. We also need a brochure that explains why oth­er cit­i­zens should vote for our pro­pos­al. And we’re going to need a white paper to explain to City Coun­cil the prin­ci­ples that inform our pro­pos­al. We’ve got a lot of work to do. Can you help us?”
The pub­lic beta opens on August 15, and they’re doing this as a Cre­ative Com­mons project. I need to put that date on the cal­en­dar!